As of 31 October 2020, the UK had concluded 24 trade agreements with 53 countries, some using an appropriate approach to quickly replicate existing agreements between the EU and these countries, mentioning only those areas of low differentiation (which has reduced some agreements to around 40 pages from the original 1400 agreement). Among these, there are important economies – in terms of nominal GDP – such as South Korea, Switzerland, Israel and South Africa. “But the past few months have shown the ease with which populist and protectionist policies can disrupt international relations and increase trade risk,” he said, calling on Britain and China to “resist this urge.” A free trade agreement aims to promote trade – usually with goods, but also sometimes with services – by making it cheaper. This is often through the reduction or elimination of so-called tariffs – government taxes or fees for cross-border trade. The UK and the EU are negotiating a trade deal that will start on 1 January 2021, when the new RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE UK and the EU will begin. . . .